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Paul Vanderzee
Paul Vanderzee

A World Without Princes: What Happens When Princesses Rule and Princes Disappear?


A World Without Princes: A Review of the Second Book in The School for Good and Evil Series




Introduction




If you are a fan of fairy tales, fantasy, and adventure, you might have heard of The School for Good and Evil series by Soman Chainani. This series follows the adventures of two best friends, Sophie and Agatha, who are kidnapped from their village and taken to a mysterious school where children are trained to become either heroes or villains in fairy tales. The first book in the series, The School for Good and Evil, was published in 2013 and became a New York Times bestseller. It was followed by three more books: A World Without Princes (2014), The Last Ever After (2015), and Quests for Glory (2017). A fifth book, A Crystal of Time, is expected to be released in 2019.




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In this article, we will focus on the second book in the series, A World Without Princes, which continues the story of Sophie and Agatha after they return to their village from the School for Good and Evil. We will give you a summary of the plot, an analysis of the themes, and a recommendation on where you can download A World Without Princes epub for free.


Main Body




The plot of A World Without Princes




The return to the School for Good and Evil




The book begins with Sophie and Agatha living happily in their village, having escaped from the School for Good and Evil with their true love's kiss. However, their happiness is short-lived, as they soon discover that their kiss has changed the world of fairy tales. Instead of ending with "happily ever after", all fairy tales now end with "happily never after". This is because Sophie and Agatha's kiss has broken the spell that kept the balance between Good and Evil, and has unleashed a new power: Love.


As a result, all princes in fairy tales have either died or disappeared, leaving behind only princesses who have turned against each other. The School for Good and Evil has also changed: it is now divided into two rival schools: the School for Girls and the School for Boys. The School for Girls is led by Sophie, who has become the Dean after wishing to be one. The School for Boys is led by Tedros, Agatha's former love interest and son of King Arthur, who has become bitter and angry after being rejected by Agatha.


Sophie and Agatha are unhappy with their new roles, and they long to go back to their old lives. However, they soon find out that they have no choice but to return to the School for Good and Evil, as they are the only ones who can restore the balance between Good and Evil, and bring back the princes. They are summoned by the Storian, a magical pen that writes all fairy tales, and are given a new quest: to find the Endless Woods, the source of all stories, and rewrite their own ending.


The rise of the School for Girls




When Sophie and Agatha arrive at the School for Good and Evil, they are shocked to see how much it has changed. The School for Girls is a glamorous and luxurious place, where princesses are taught to be independent, powerful, and ruthless. The School for Boys is a dark and dismal place, where princes are taught to be submissive, weak, and obedient. The two schools are at war with each other, and the girls have the upper hand.


Sophie is welcomed by the girls as their leader, and she enjoys the attention and admiration she receives. She also meets Hort, a former student of the School for Evil who has become her loyal assistant. Agatha, on the other hand, is shunned by the girls as a traitor, and she feels lonely and isolated. She also meets Rafal, a mysterious and handsome stranger who claims to be her true love.


Sophie and Agatha soon realize that they have different views on how to solve their quest. Sophie believes that the only way to bring back the princes is to destroy the School for Boys and make all boys love her. Agatha believes that the only way to restore the balance is to reunite with Tedros and make him love her again. The two friends begin to drift apart, as they are influenced by their new allies and enemies.


The quest for the Storian




As Sophie and Agatha pursue their own goals, they discover that they are not the only ones who want to control the Storian. The Storian is a powerful weapon that can change the fate of anyone who writes with it. However, it is also a dangerous weapon that can destroy anyone who misuses it. The Storian has a mind of its own, and it chooses its own writer based on their story.


The Storian is coveted by many characters in the book, such as Rafal, who wants to use it to erase all fairy tales and create a new world without stories; Hort, who wants to use it to become a prince and win Sophie's heart; Tedros, who wants to use it to become a king and rule over both schools; and Dean Dovey, the former headmistress of the School for Good who has been imprisoned by Sophie.


Sophie and Agatha also want to use the Storian to rewrite their own ending, but they have different visions of what their ending should be. Sophie wants to write an ending where she is loved by everyone, especially by Agatha. Agatha wants to write an ending where she is free from everyone, especially from Sophie. The two friends end up fighting over the Storian, which leads to a tragic consequence.


The battle of the sexes




The climax of the book is a battle between the School for Girls and the School for Boys, which takes place in Camelot, Tedros' home kingdom. The battle is triggered by Sophie's attempt to kidnap Tedros and force him to marry her. Agatha tries to stop her, but she is betrayed by Rafal, who reveals his true identity: he is the Snake Prince, an ancient enemy of fairy tales who has been manipulating Agatha all along.


The battle is fierce and bloody, as both sides use magic and weapons to fight each other. Many characters are injured or killed in the process. Sophie and Agatha face off against each other in a final showdown, where they have to choose between their friendship or their love interests. They also have to face their own inner conflicts: Sophie has to decide whether she is Good or Evil; Agatha has to decide whether she is Happy or Unhappy.


The outcome of the battle depends on how Sophie and Agatha write their ending with the Storian. Will they choose each other or themselves? Will they choose love or power? Will they choose Good or Evil? The answer will determine not only their fate, but also the fate of all fairy tales.


The themes of A World Without Princes




Feminism and gender roles




One of the main themes of A World Without Princes is feminism and gender roles. The book explores how gender stereotypes affect people's expectations and behaviors in fairy tales and in real life. It also challenges these stereotypes by showing different perspectives and possibilities for both girls and boys.


Friendship and betrayal




Another theme of A World Without Princes is friendship and betrayal. The book explores how friendship can be tested by love, jealousy, ambition, and loyalty. It also shows how betrayal can have devastating consequences for both the betrayer and the betrayed.


For example, in A World Without Princes, we see how Sophie and Agatha's friendship is strained by their different choices and desires. Sophie feels betrayed by Agatha for choosing Tedros over her, and she tries to sabotage their relationship. Agatha feels betrayed by Sophie for becoming the Dean of the School for Girls, and she tries to stop her from harming the boys. The two friends end up hurting each other and themselves, as they lose sight of their true feelings.


We also see how other characters betray or are betrayed by their friends or enemies. For instance, Hort betrays Tedros by joining Sophie's side and helping her kidnap him. Rafal betrays Agatha by pretending to be her true love and manipulating her emotions. Dean Dovey betrays Sophie by trying to take away her power and free Tedros. Tedros betrays Agatha by doubting her loyalty and accusing her of being a witch.


The book shows that betrayal can have serious consequences, such as breaking trust, causing pain, and starting wars. However, it also shows that betrayal can be forgiven, if the betrayer is sincere and remorseful. For example, Hort apologizes to Tedros for his betrayal and helps him escape from Sophie. Agatha forgives Rafal for his betrayal and spares his life. Sophie forgives Dean Dovey for her betrayal and lets her go. Tedros forgives Agatha for her betrayal and kisses her.


Choice and destiny




A third theme of A World Without Princes is choice and destiny. The book explores how people can shape their own fate by making decisions, or how they can be influenced by external forces that seem to control their fate. It also questions whether there is such a thing as a fixed destiny, or whether there are multiple possibilities for one's future.


For example, in A World Without Princes, we see how Sophie and Agatha make choices that affect their destiny. Sophie chooses to be the Dean of the School for Girls, which makes her powerful but lonely. Agatha chooses to be with Tedros, which makes her happy but endangered. The two friends also choose to write their own ending with the Storian, which determines their fate.


We also see how other characters make choices that affect their destiny. For example, Rafal chooses to erase all fairy tales, which makes him a threat to everyone. Hort chooses to become a prince, which makes him a hero to some and a villain to others. Tedros chooses to become a king, which makes him a leader but also a target.


The book shows that choices can have positive or negative outcomes, depending on one's intentions and actions. However, it also shows that choices can be influenced by external forces, such as magic, prophecy, or fate. For example, Sophie and Agatha are chosen by the Storian to write their ending, which implies that they have a special destiny. Rafal is cursed by a prophecy that he will die by the hand of his true love, which limits his choices. Tedros is destined to be a king because of his bloodline, which puts pressure on him.


Good and evil




A fourth theme of A World Without Princes is good and evil. The book explores how good and evil are not always clear-cut categories, but rather complex concepts that depend on one's perspective and context. It also challenges the idea that good and evil are mutually exclusive or opposite forces, and suggests that they can coexist or overlap in one person or situation.


For example, in A World Without Princes, we see how good and evil are not always easy to define or identify. Sophie is considered good by the girls but evil by the boys. Agatha is considered evil by the girls but good by the boys. Rafal is considered evil by everyone but himself. Hort is considered good by Sophie but evil by Tedros. Dean Dovey is considered good by Tedros but evil by Sophie.


We also see how good and evil are not always separate or opposed forces, but rather interrelated or intertwined forces. Sophie and Agatha are both good and evil, depending on their actions and motives. Rafal and Hort are both good and evil, depending on their past and present. Tedros and Dean Dovey are both good and evil, depending on their goals and methods.


The book shows that good and evil are not static or absolute concepts, but rather dynamic and relative concepts that can change over time or vary across situations. It also shows that good and evil are not determined by one's appearance or origin, but rather by one's character and choices.


Conclusion




What makes A World Without Princes a good read?




A World Without Princes is a good read for many reasons. First of all, it is a well-written and engaging story that keeps the reader hooked from the first page to the last. The plot is fast-paced and full of twists and turns that surprise and thrill the reader. The characters are well-developed and realistic, with flaws and strengths that make them relatable and likable. The dialogue is witty and humorous, with clever references and jokes that make the reader laugh.


Secondly, it is a creative and original story that subverts and reinvents the fairy tale genre. The book takes familiar fairy tale elements, such as princes, princesses, witches, magic, and quests, and gives them a fresh and modern spin. The book also challenges the stereotypes and clichés of fairy tales, such as gender roles, love at first sight, happy endings, and good versus evil, and offers alternative and nuanced perspectives on them.


Thirdly, it is a meaningful and thought-provoking story that explores important themes and issues that are relevant to today's society. The book addresses topics such as feminism, friendship, betrayal, choice, destiny, good, and evil, and invites the reader to reflect on them. The book also raises questions about the nature and role of stories in our lives, such as how they shape our identity, values, beliefs, and actions.


How does A World Without Princes set up the next book in the series?




A World Without Princes sets up the next book in the series, The Last Ever After, by leaving some unresolved conflicts and mysteries that will be continued in the final installment. For example:



  • The fate of Sophie and Agatha after they write their ending with the Storian.



  • The fate of Rafal after he is spared by Agatha.



  • The fate of Hort after he becomes a prince.



  • The fate of Tedros after he becomes a king.



  • The fate of Dean Dovey after she is freed by Sophie.



  • The fate of the School for Good and Evil after the battle.



  • The fate of the Endless Woods after the Storian's intervention.



  • The fate of all fairy tales after Sophie and Agatha's kiss.



The book also hints at some possible developments and challenges that will be faced by the characters in the next book. For example:



  • The possibility of Sophie becoming Evil or Agatha becoming Good.



  • The possibility of Rafal seeking revenge or redemption.



  • The possibility of Hort finding love or trouble.



  • The possibility of Tedros facing danger or glory.



  • The possibility of Dean Dovey restoring order or chaos.



  • The possibility of the School for Good and Evil being reunited or destroyed.



  • The possibility of the Endless Woods being saved or lost.



  • The possibility of all fairy tales being restored or erased.



Where can you download A World Without Princes epub for free?




If you are interested in reading A World Without Princes, you might be wondering where you can download it for free in epub format. Epub is a popular file format for e-books that can be read on various devices, such as computers, tablets, smartphones, e-readers, etc. However, downloading epub files for free can be risky, as they might contain viruses, malware, or illegal content that can harm your device or violate copyright laws.


provides access to millions of free books, movies, music, and other digital content. You can download A World Without Princes epub from Archive.org by following these steps:



  • Go to https://archive.org/details/worldwithoutprin0000chai.



  • Click on the "Download options" button on the right side of the page.



  • Select "EPUB" from the list of available formats.



  • Click on the "Download" button and save the file to your device.



You can also read A World Without Princes online on Archive.org by clicking on the "Read online" button on the same page.





This concludes my article on A World Without Princes. I hope you enjoyed reading it and learned something new. If you have any questions or feedback, please let me know. Thank you for your attention and have a great day!


FAQs





  • Q: Who is the author of A World Without Princes? A: The author of A World Without Princes is Soman Chainani, an American writer and filmmaker who was born in Mumbai, India. He is best known for his The School for Good and Evil series, which has sold over 3 million copies worldwide and has been translated into 30 languages. He is also working on a film adaptation of the series for Netflix.



  • Q: What is the genre of A World Without Princes? A: The genre of A World Without Princes is fantasy fairytale. It is a subgenre of fantasy that draws inspiration from fairy tales, folklore, myths, and legends. It often features magical elements, such as witches, dragons, spells, curses, etc., as well as themes such as good versus evil, love versus hate, choice versus destiny, etc.



  • Q: How many pages does A World Without Princes have? A: The number of pages in A World Without Princes varies depending on the edition and format. The hardcover edition has 433 pages, the paperback edition has 448 pages, and the epub edition has 512 pages.



  • Q: What is the reading level of A World Without Princes? A: The reading level of A World Without Princes is suitable for ages 10 and up. It has an Accelerated Reader level of 5.7, which means that it is appropriate for readers who are in fifth grade or higher. It also has a Lexile measure of 790L, which means that it is moderately difficult to read.



Q: What are some similar books to A World Without Princes? A: Some similar books to A World Without Princes are:


  • The Land of Stories series by Chris Colfer, which follows the adventures of two twins who enter a magical world of fairy tales.



  • The Lunar Chronicles series by Marissa Meyer, which reimagines classic fairy tales in a futuristic setting with cyborgs, androids, and aliens.



  • The Sisters Grimm series by Michael Buckley, which follows the descendants of the Brothers Grimm who solve mysteries involving fairy tale characters.



  • The Ever Afters series by Shelby Bach, which follows a girl who joins a secret school where students learn to become characters in fairy tales.



  • The Fairy-Tale Detectives series by Michael Buckley, which follows two sisters who inherit a detective agency that deals with fairy tale crimes.



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